Frequent question: What causes sewing machine tension problems?

Why does my sewing machine keep losing tension?

Needles, threads, and fabrics: Different thread sizes and types on top and in the bobbin can throw off basic tension settings. A needle that’s too large or small for the thread can also unbalance your stitches, because the size of the hole adds to or reduces the total top tension.

How do you diagnose sewing tension problems?

Diagnosing faulty tension

Thread the machine with different colors of thread in the needle and bobbin. Sew 6 inches or so, and look at the fabric’s right and wrong sides. If there are loops on the right side (red thread with black loops), the upper thread tension is too tight.

Why is my thread bunching underneath?

A: Looping on the underside, or back of the fabric, means the top tension is too loose compared to the bobbin tension, so the bobbin thread is pulling too much top thread underneath. By tightening the top tension, the loops will stop, but the added tension may cause breakage, especially with sensitive threads.

How do you tighten thread tension?

Changing Bobbin Tension

You should see a small screw on the flat/closed side of the bobbin case. Turning the screw a tiny bit counterclockwise will loosen the bobbin tension; turning it clockwise will tighten the tension.

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What tension should I use for stretchy fabric?

Tension: For loftier knits or stable knits, like ponte or scuba knit fabrics, try a lower tension around 2 or 3. Around 4 is usually good for heavyweight knits. The 4-5 Tension range generally yields the best results with light to medium weight knits.

What tension should I use for thin cotton?

Use size 70/10 for really thin cotton like voile, size 80/12 for light to medium weight cotton, and 90/14 for thick cotton like denim.