Who keeps the quilts in everyday use?

Who gets to keep the quilts at the end of everyday use?

At the end of “Everyday Use,” Maggie gets the quilts. Initially, Mama intended to give one of the quilts to Dee; however, when Dee left for school she turned the quilt down because she was not interested in hanging on to any memory of her family’s hard-working, lower-class lifestyle.

What happens to the quilts in everyday use?

In Dee’s character, Walker illustrates the choice to put the past behind us. The climax of “Everyday Use” occurs when the mother abruptly decides to give the quilts to Maggie and not Dee (Miss Wangero). With this moment as the climax, the mother decides that the quilts should go to Maggie and not Dee.

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Who pieced the quilts that Dee wants?

These quilts were “pieced by Grandma Dee and then Big Dee “(76), both figures in family history who, unlike the present Dee, took charge in teaching their culture and heritage to their offspring.

Why does Maggie get the quilts in everyday use?

Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. She even knows how to quilt herself. Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

Why did Dee want the quilts?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

Why does the narrator want Maggie to have the quilts instead of Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

Why does Mama give the quilt to Maggie?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

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What did the quilts mean to Maggie?

These quilts are familial heirlooms, and Maggie’s mother likes to use them as often as possible. They represent the family’s history and heritage to each character. … Her mother and grandmother see the quilts as symbols of history and heritage, and they cherish this history very dearly.

What does the quilt represent to Dee to Maggie and to Mama?

The quilts bring together the family in a battle of self identity and history. Maggie was promised the right to them, Dee expects to be given them, and Mama is stuck in the middle of her children and her ancestors.

What is special about the two quilts Dee wants?

The quilts that the mother takes from Dee’s hands and returns to Maggie symbolize the conflict of tradition and progress. … The two quilts that Dee wants are pieces of her ancestors lives, “the sacred generations of women” of whom, her mother realizes, Maggie is, indeed, a part.

How does Dee View her mother and sister?

Dee is confident educated and has a strong personality. She thinks she is superior to her mother and sister and understands the world better. Although she loves her family she is ashamed for her friends to meet them. … Dee respects her mother but thinks she is more educated and better than her mother.

Why is Dee angry at the end of the story?

At the end of the story, Dee, who was always brighter, better-looking, and favored, is angry because her mother refuses to give the quilts which she, Grandma Dee, and Big Dee made over the years.

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Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

Why does Mama think that Maggie is the rightful owner of the quilts?

Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.