Why is brioche stitch called that?

What does brioche mean in knitting?

Brioche knitting is a distinctive knitted ribbing technique that is recognizable by its heightened, doughy texture. The fabric is achieved by alternating columns of slipped stitches with yarnovers and knit stitches (or purl stitches, but we’ll get to that later).

When was brioche knitting invented?

The Brioche Stitch: A History Lesson

One of the earliest published references to brioche stitch was Frances Lambert’s The Handbook of Needlework (1842). It described the brioche stitch (“bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together”) and gave instructions for using the stitch to create a doughnut-like cushion.

Does fisherman’s rib use more wool?

Projects worked in fisherman’s rib or brioche may require up to 35% more yarn than a comparable stockinette stitch project. It takes two rows to complete one full row of fisherman’s rib or brioche.

Does brioche knitting use more yarn?

Brioche works best on loose-fitting garments that require ease. Because brioche stitches create a very lofty fabric, it is advisable to go down a needle size or two when making brioche to somewhat control its ‘give’. Brioche knitting uses more yarn than, say, stockinette stitch – up to twice as much.

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