Why should Maggie get the quilts in everyday use?

Why does Dee think Maggie should not have the quilts?

Why does Maggie want the quilts in everyday use?

Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. She even knows how to quilt herself. Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

Why does Maggie want the churn and quilts?

Her sister Maggie sees the world in a much different way. It is because of the hands that have joined the tidbits of cloth together that she values the quilts and wants to use them “everyday,” and so honor the lives of love and sacrifice of her ancestors.

What would Maggie do with the quilts?

‘” Dee wants to hang the quilts on her wall, to display them as evidence of some heritage that is in the past, that is dead. Maggie, however, knows how to quilt and would use the quilts for the reason for which they were created: to keep warm.

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Who should get the quilts Maggie or Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

Why did Mama give Maggie the quilts?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

Why does Dee think Maggie should not have the quilts?

Answer: because Maggie does not appreciate their artistic value. In “Everyday Use,” Dee believes that Maggie does not deserve to have the quilts that their grandmother made. Dee believes that the quilts are an artistic piece, and that they should not be devalued by using them everyday in the way Maggie would like to.

Why does Mama think that Maggie is the rightful owner of the quilts?

Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.

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What do the quilts symbolize in everyday use?

The quilts are pieces of living history, documents in fabric that chronicle the lives of the various generations and the trials, such as war and poverty, that they faced. The quilts serve as a testament to a family’s history of pride and struggle.

Why does Dee think Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage?

Dee thinks Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage because they don’t change from it. In Dee’s mind, Maggie and Mama lack the “Ethnic Pride” to leave the historical borders and live a prosperous life. In saying ‘”You ought to try to make something of yourself, too, Maggie.

What different uses would Maggie and Dee have for the quilts?

Maggie would have put the quilts to everyday use while Dee wished to hang them as artistic pieces on her walls. The latter wanted to preserve their African heritage but in doing so she completely ignored the fact that the quilts were made by her grandmother, mother and aunt to put to everyday use.

What does Dee mean when she says mama doesn’t understand their heritage?

When Dee/Wangero tells her mother, “You just don’t understand… your heritage,” she implies that hand-made artistic items in their family should be put on display instead of being used. … Dee has rejected her birth name, which comes from Dicie, a family name traceable to the Civil War, in favor of Wangero.