Question: Why does Dee want Maggie to have the quilts?

Why does the mother finally decide to give the quilts to Maggie instead of to Dee?

Why does Dee want to take the quilts that have been promised to Maggie?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. … At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

Why does Dee think that Maggie does not deserve the quilts?

Although Maggie is intimidated by her sister, she does not hesitate to demonstrate her displeasure when Dee asks to have the old quilts. She suggests that Maggie would not appreciate the quilts and would instead put them to everyday use. Dee feels a sense of entitlement, which defines her relationship with Maggie.

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Why does Maggie want the quilts?

Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. She even knows how to quilt herself. Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

Why does Dee Wangero want the quilts?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

Why does Dee want the quilts Now why didn’t Dee want them in college Why does Maggie get them?

Expert Answers

Dee wants the old quilts for several reasons but mainly because she wants to display them as part of her “heritage” in her home in the city. She does not believe that they are appreciated in the country with Maggie and Mama because they actually use the quilts.

What terrible thing happened to Maggie when she was a child everyday use?

What terrible thing happened to Maggie when she was a child? Severely burned in a house fire when she was a child, her scarred, ugly appearance hides her sympathetic, generous nature. She lives at home and is protected by Mama, remaining virtually untouched by the outside world.

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Why is Dee angry at the end of the story?

At the end of the story, Dee, who was always brighter, better-looking, and favored, is angry because her mother refuses to give the quilts which she, Grandma Dee, and Big Dee made over the years.

Does the mother’s refusal let Dee have the quilts?

In “Everyday Use,” Mama’s refusal to let Dee have the quilts represents a permanent change in their relationship because Mama finally realizes that Dee does not hold the same cultural values that she and Maggie hold.

What does Maggie want in everyday use?

It’s pretty clear that Maggie wants the quilts but is not strong or confident enough to speak up. Mama takes Maggie’s side and wrests the quilts from Dee. At the end, Maggie finally smiles, “a real smile, not scared,” so we know that she is satisfied with this result. Maggie is Mama’s youngest daughter.

What is special about the two quilts Dee wants?

The quilts that the mother takes from Dee’s hands and returns to Maggie symbolize the conflict of tradition and progress. … The two quilts that Dee wants are pieces of her ancestors lives, “the sacred generations of women” of whom, her mother realizes, Maggie is, indeed, a part.

What does this was Maggie’s portion mean?

She looked at her sister with something like fear but she wasn’t mad at her. This was Maggie’s portion. This was the way she knew God to work. ( 75) The narrator sees that Maggie has basically resigned to accepting the injustices of the world, even relatively small injustices like her sister always getting everything.

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What does Dee mean when she says mama doesn’t understand their heritage?

When Dee/Wangero tells her mother, “You just don’t understand… your heritage,” she implies that hand-made artistic items in their family should be put on display instead of being used. … Dee has rejected her birth name, which comes from Dicie, a family name traceable to the Civil War, in favor of Wangero.