Why is Kitchener stitch so called?

Why is it called the Kitchener Stitch?

The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type of seam. The yarn follows the route of a row of ordinary knitting. This is often done when closing off a knitted sock at the toe. The technique is named after Horatio Herbert Kitchener, though the technique was practiced long before.

Is there an alternative to Kitchener Stitch?

The Finchley graft is an easy to remember alternative to the Kitchener stitch for joining 2 rows of live knitting stitches.

How much tail do you need for Kitchener Stitch?

Cut the yarn so that the tail is approximately four times the length of the row of stitches. For example, if the live stitches are about 5 inches wide on the needle when spread out comfortably, then cut the yarn with a tail approximately 20 inches long.

Is Kitchener stitch same as grafting?

Kitchener Stitch Will Make You Fall in Love With Seaming. … It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “grafting”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

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